docs
api  ·  notebook  ·  platform  ·  faqs  ·  how tos
Notebook
Introduction
Getting Started
Creating a Notebook
Output Types
Using Modules
Helpful Links

Modules
Creating a Module
Properties
Source Code
Icon
Documentation

Core Functions
nb.dataset
nb.title
nb.author
nb.date
nb.text
nb.section
nb.print
nb.break
nb.image
nb.tex

Vector Functions
nb.generate
nb.random
nb.drop
nb.mean
nb.mode
nb.median
nb.variance
nb.stdev
nb.fact

Chart Functions
nb.plot
nb.barplot
nb.lineplot
nb.areaplot
nb.bubbleplot
nb.piechart
nb.barchart
nb.table

Introduction

Getting Started

Welcome to NotebookJS Documentation! If you haven't already, take a look at this about page on NotebookJS.
The Datazar Notebook system is designed so that anyone who knows JavaScript can get into scientific or technical computing.

Since your data is already in your Datazar projects, you can directly call your datasets and load them into your Notebook so you can manipulate them.

Creating a Notebook

A Notebook file is treated the same way as any of other files on Datazar. Just like the R and SQL files, the Notebook can be run directly from your browser. To create a Notebook, simply navigate to one of your projects and click on the 'Create File' button. Once the a window popups up, chose 'NotebookJS File' and it will take you to the workspace console.


Output Types

The Notebook system has various ways of showing you your variables or outputs from functions. Because we care about how Notebooks look and how they are shared, everything you type in your Notebook is not show on the output display by default.
The objects that are shown by default are Core functions or Chart functions. These functions will be displayed on the output screen. If you want to display any variable or function output, use the nb.print() function.

Using Modules

Modules are small packages of code that are written by the Datazar community. If you have skills in Javascript, you can write Modules that help users do more with less code.
For example, if you are working on financial documents and want to use financial functions, you can 'include' one of the finance modules that have already been written so you don't have to re-write functions your self.
If you are familiar with R, the statistical language, Modules are the equivalent to the 'packages' you install in R.


To learn more about how you can create Notebook Modules, head over to the Module documentation.